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A Bald Eagle shown eating at a deer carcass

The bald eagle population has slowly recovered from the impact of a pesticide that nearly drove them to extinction decades ago. But now researchers at Cornell University have found that lead ammunition continues to hamper the resilience of these American icons.
A Bald Eagle in flight

As the number of American bald eagles has continued to soar in recent years, Cornell researchers are now warning the species’ reemergence is being threatened by lead poisoning from gun ammunition. 
Bald Eagle radiograph from Avian Haven

Bald eagle populations have slowly recovered from near devastation after the government banned DDT in 1972, but another ongoing issue has weakened that rebound – lead poisoning from gunshot ammunition.
A Bald Eagle shown eating at a deer carcass

For Your Information

Bald eagles are considered a recovery success in the U.S. after rebounding from near extirpation due to widespread use of DDT. Although abundances of bald eagles have increased since DDT was banned, other contaminants have remained in the environment with unknown influence on eagle population trends.
Four-toed salamander byTodd Pierson

Environmental DNA techniques can detect a deadly virus in amphibian ponds, giving wildlife managers critical information about how to best protect vulnerable amphibian species.
A Fisher shown in a tree

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently renewed the New York State Wildlife Health Program for $6.4 million over five years. This partnership has enabled Cornell to work with the state’s wildlife biologists on threats that affect all of New York's wildlife.
Examining a rhino in mid-transport as part of a study on the technique’s health impacts. (Photo courtesy of Robin Radcliffe)

Cornell's Dr. Robin Radcliffe and his research team won a 2021 Ig Nobel for their work in Namibia on methods of relocating black rhinos—which is often vital to protect the critically endangered species from poachers.
Sumatran tiger crouching to drink water

Dr. Martin Gilbert, Wild Carnivore Specialist at the Cornell Wildlife Health Center, has worked extensively documenting the threat of canine distemper virus (CDV) to endangered Amur tigers in the Russian Far East. He is now working to determine the threat of CDV to other tiger subspecies.
Bald Eagles feeding on a carcass left by a hunter by Chelsea Geyer, NYSDEC Wildlife technician

There is no safe level of lead for any wildlife species, and a hunter’s ammunition choice can mean life or death for scavenging wildlife.
A portrait of Hery Ríos-Guzmán

Blog

Cornell veterinary student Hery Ríos-Guzmán, DVM '24, writes about how the AQUAVETⓇ I Program has helped him feel better prepared for a future as an aquatic veterinarian.