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The Veterinary One Health Association (VOHA) at Cornell hosted its annual symposium featuring guest speakers, special lectures and a virtual poster session covering One Health issues.
Bald Eagle x-ray from SPCA Serving Erie County

A severely injured young bald eagle had surgery at the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital and was successfully released after it recovered.

History is pockmarked with the scars of past zoonotic outbreaks. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky discusses how global cooperation in a unified “one health” effort is needed to prevent the next pandemic.
Red-tailed Hawk being released back into the wild by Christine Bogdanowicz

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By analyzing case records, Cornell researchers helped clarify and quantify the causes for wildlife rehabilitation, species involved, and treatment outcomes.
Niagara River Lake trout by Christine Bogdanowicz

Using the most technologically advanced test to make a diagnosis might seem like a logical move, but a new commentary paper co-authored by Cornell Aquatics Scientist Dr. Rod Getchell warns veterinary clinicians and researchers that a diagnosis cannot rely on tests alone.
ʻAkiapōlāʻau (Hemignathus wilsoni) is an endangered Hawaiʻi honeycreeper species

Dr. Katherine McClure, a quantitative disease ecologist, has been working with Birds, Not Mosquitoes as a Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability postdoctoral fellow with the Cornell Wildlife Health Center to develop and evaluate incompatible insect technique (IIT) release strategies to help save Hawai‘i’s native bird populations from avian malaria.
Ig Nobel prize for rhino tranportation video screenshot

Video

Watch the announcement of this year's Ig Nobel Transportation Prize, awarded to a Cornell-led team for their research on whether it's safer for rhinos to be transported upside-down or on their side.  
Rhino being hung upside down for transportation

A Cornell-led study that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals to aid conservation efforts has been awarded one of this year's Ig Nobel prizes.
A Black-footed ferret shown looking back

By testing easier-to-study coyotes, Cornell researchers, in collaboration with the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, have identified a range of lethal diseases threatening black-footed ferrets – one of the most endangered animals in North America.
Red fox with kit by Christine Bogdanowicz news thumbnail

There is astonishing diversity in how mammal mothers undergo pregnancy and birth. Dr. Alexander Travis, a Cornell reproductive biologist, describes how 'the birds and the bees' work for these unique animals.