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A Red-tailed Hawk shown carrying prey in talons

For Your Information

Anticoagulant rodenticides continue to be used across the U.S. as a method for controlling pest rodent species. As a consequence, wild birds of prey are exposed to these toxicants by eating poisoned prey items.
A sail-driven fishing boat shown in open water

Cornell's Dr. Kathryn Fiorella seeks to ensure the health of fisheries by taking into account the nutritional and livelihood needs of the people who depend on them.
A Snow goose being treated at Cornell's wildlife hospital

Each spring, large flocks of snow geese make their annual trek from the south back up to their Arctic breeding grounds. One goose’s journey was interrupted, however, by an increasingly common threat to wildlife — lead toxicity. 
A Snow goose being treated at Cornell's wildlife hospital

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This female snow goose came to the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital for lead toxicity. She couldn’t keep up with her flock on its migration north because she was too sick to fly. The Cornell team nursed her back to health and she was released back into the wild.

Raina Plowright, a world-renowned ecologist and epidemiologist who studies the mechanisms that drive the spillover of pathogens between species, has joined the College of Veterinary Medicine. Her transdisciplinary work demonstrates that preserving and restoring wildlife habitats can stop pathogen spillover by minimizing contact between infected wildlife and potentially susceptible livestock or human hosts. 
An Eastern Phoebe being treated at the wildlife hospital

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An eastern phoebe songbird was found in a glue trap meant to capture insects and was taken to Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital for treatment.
An Eastern Phoebe being treated at the wildlife hospital

Found in a glue trap meant to capture insects, an eastern phoebe songbird was taken to Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital after its rescuers attempted to free the creature from the powerful adhesive.
A tiny kit fox being cared for at the wildlife hospital

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A tiny red fox kit was recently treated for a swollen paw at Cornell's Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital. The fox is expected to make a full recovery.
A tiny kit fox being cared for at the wildlife hospital

A tiny red fox kit is getting world-class care at Cornell University’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital. The four-to-six-week old baby was found with her paw caught in a plastic rat trap and Cornell’s wildlife health team is helping to heal the fox’s swollen paw and get the baby back to full health.
A student drawing that illustrates fish pathology

Cornell veterinary student Laura Donohue, DVM '22, showcases her artistic talent and passion for animals in a new book, "Wildlife Health and Disease in Conservation," featuring >100 illustrations depicting common wildlife disease cycles and their social, cultural and economic influences.