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Person wearing face mask sitting outside with cat

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky states "this is a viral lottery," describing how all sorts of wildlife normally separated by continents are brought together at markets in Asia. "If you're a virus and you survive by spreading, you couldn't create a more perfect system for aiding and abetting the next pandemic."   
Researcher in lab

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted lives and institutions around the world in numerous ways, and Cornell faculty members have shared their expertise on everything from the virus itself to impacts on local and global economies.
Vet student with rhino

At a critical time for the future of life on Earth, The College of Veterinary Medicine announces the establishment of the Cornell Wildlife Health Center. The new center focuses on catalyzing multidisciplinary collaboration to address wildlife health challenges worldwide, while immersing students in unique learning experiences at home and abroad.
Lioness on operating table

A big cat got the lion’s share of attention when her keepers brought her to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA). There, Ntsumi the white African lioness was diagnosed with an intestinal mass that veterinarians surgically removed.
Lioness on operating table

Video

Cornell veterinarians successfully removed an intestinal mass from an unusual patient: Ntsumi, the white African lioness from Animal Adventure Park. Now fully recovered, Ntsumi has rejoined her pride.
Cornell Vet School courtyard

New research from an interdisciplinary Cornell team has found that it takes as few as 10 minutes in a natural setting for college students to feel happier and lessen the effects of stress both physically and mentally.
Two individuals shown with hard hats and masks with the text "Coronavirus" juxtaposed over the image of the people

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center’s Dr. Steve Osofsky describes how One Health thinking can help humanity avoid outbreaks of emerging diseases like Wuhan coronavirus.
Scene from an isolation ward with a person in protective clothing

As the coronavirus continues to spread in China and beyond, Cornell’s Dr. Steve Osofsky says it’s time to shut down the "wet markets" the virus came from.
A Big brown bat with her wing wrapped to stabilize a wing injury

Blog

Cornell veterinary student Loren Lassiter ’22 spent time volunteering at Wild Things Sanctuary in Ithaca, NY, working with a variety of local bat species.
Cornell veterinarian examines a captive elephant as vet students look on

A 23-year partnership between Syracuse’s Rosamond Gifford Zoo and Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine provides care for endangered species while giving veterinarians and students specialized training.