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Siberian tiger walking in snow

New research published by Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Martin Gilbert in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that vaccination of endangered Amur (Siberian) tigers is the only practical strategy to protect these big cats from a dangerous disease in their natural habitat in the Russian Far East.
Cornell researchers participate in a "One Health Perspectives" session

Cornell researchers participated in an open discussion during the “One Health Perspectives” session as part of the COVID-19 Summit, a two-day event featuring researchers from across Cornell.
Medical worker wearing face mask and eye shield

The history of an approach to health to prevent future pandemics.
White-tailed deer standing in snow

Rabid deer have been found in Cortland and Cayuga counties in New York State, but according to Cornell Wildlife Disease Ecologist Dr. Krysten Schuler, there does not appear to be an abnormally high number of cases occurring in the region.
Baby bobcat sitting on floor

Dottie, a 3-month old bobcat, came to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals due to a limp in her hind legs. Following hip surgery, she is bouncing back and recovering well.
Rings in water

Veterinary toxicologist Dr. Karyn Bischoff and other experts discuss the problem with single-use plastics and how they are impacting the health of the planet.
Baby bobcat looking towards camera

Video

A baby bobcat named Dottie was treated at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals for an infection and a joint injury after taking a fall.
Puma sitting near forest

The slowdown in human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly travel, has created a unique opportunity for scientists to better understand human-wildlife interactions.
Birds in marketplace

A bipartisan bill, the Preventing Future Pandemics Act, would direct the State Department to work with international partners to shut down commercial wildlife markets, end the trade in live wildlife for human consumption and stop the associated wildlife trade, end the import, export, and sale of live wildlife for human consumption in the United States, and phase out demand for wildlife as a food source.
Visit to the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse showing a silky chicken being treated by zoo veterinarian

Our partners at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo broke ground on a new Animal Health Center that will help boost our collaborative animal care and research efforts.