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Baby bobcat sitting on floor

Dottie, a 3-month old bobcat, came to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals due to a limp in her hind legs. Following hip surgery, she is bouncing back and recovering well.
Rings in water

Veterinary toxicologist Dr. Karyn Bischoff and other experts discuss the problem with single-use plastics and how they are impacting the health of the planet.
Baby bobcat looking towards camera

Video

A baby bobcat named Dottie was treated at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals for an infection and a joint injury after taking a fall.
Puma sitting near forest

The slowdown in human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly travel, has created a unique opportunity for scientists to better understand human-wildlife interactions.
Birds in marketplace

A bipartisan bill, the Preventing Future Pandemics Act, would direct the State Department to work with international partners to shut down commercial wildlife markets, end the trade in live wildlife for human consumption and stop the associated wildlife trade, end the import, export, and sale of live wildlife for human consumption in the United States, and phase out demand for wildlife as a food source.
Visit to the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse showing a silky chicken being treated by zoo veterinarian

Our partners at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo broke ground on a new Animal Health Center that will help boost our collaborative animal care and research efforts.
Cornell student teaching children about the role sea birds play in the ecosystem

Blog

Cornell veterinary student Alexander Levitskiy ’24 reflects on his experience working in Indonesia last summer as part of an international program that exposes students to wildlife conservation work.
Bat hanging from tree

For Your Information

The mixing of multiple coronaviruses, and their apparent amplification along the wildlife supply chain into restaurants, suggests maximal risk for end consumers and likely underpins the mechanisms of zoonotic spillover to people.
Cottontail rabbit in a field with flower in its mouth

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2 has been rapidly spreading across the western half of the United States, and Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler advises not handling wild rabbits at this time.
Two women wearing face masks

For Your Information

The COVID-19 pandemic is only the latest instance of an infectious pathogen jumping from animals to people. How to prevent the next pandemic is a matter of vigorous debate, and this report examines some of the key issues around virological research and human activities that can enable disease emergence (such as deforestation and the wildlife trade), and considers how conservation of wilderness and associated biodiversity can make us safer.