Skip to main content

Cornell University

News

Sue Holt with husband in Africa

Cornell Wildlife Health Center donor Sue Holt describes how her special connection to southern Africa led her to support our Beyond Fences program and make a significant difference in the well-being of people and wildlife in the region. 
Siberian tiger walking in snow

In this commentary, Cornell's Dr. Martin Gilbert and WCS's Dale Miquelle argue that it is incumbent upon science-based conservation agencies to consider vaccinating high-risk tiger populations where epidemiological research indicates that it is necessary to mitigate extinction risks.
Juvenile Gyrfalcon being released

As temperatures warm, pathogens that were once unable to survive the harsh weather conditions of the far north are now encroaching northward and could become a substantial problem for Gyrfalcons.
Tiger sitting in grass

A team led by Cornell's Dr. Martin Gilbert has shown that vaccinating endangered Amur tigers is the only viable method of protecting the species from canine distemper virus, which causes respiratory and neurological infections in tigers and other carnivores.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Two Amur Tigers resting in the snow; photo provided by Wildlife Conservation Society

We vaccinate our dogs against the canine distemper virus, but it also affects wildlife, including the rare Amur tiger. Our own Dr. Martin Gilbert’s pioneering work shows how vaccinating Amur tigers against canine distemper virus could reduce their risk of extinction.
Siberian Tiger standing in snow

New research published by Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Martin Gilbert in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that vaccination of endangered Amur (Siberian) tigers is the only practical strategy to protect these big cats from a dangerous disease in their natural habitat in the Russian Far East.
Cornell researchers participate in a "One Health Perspectives" session

Cornell researchers participated in an open discussion during the “One Health Perspectives” session as part of the COVID-19 Summit, a two-day event featuring researchers from across Cornell.
Medical worker wearing face mask and eye shield

The history of an approach to health to prevent future pandemics.
White-tailed deer standing in snow

Rabid deer have been found in Cortland and Cayuga counties in New York State, but according to Cornell Wildlife Disease Ecologist Dr. Krysten Schuler, there does not appear to be an abnormally high number of cases occurring in the region.