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Steve Osofsky standing by jeep in Bwabwata National Park

From Ithaca to the plains of southern Africa, the Cornell Wildlife Health Center is working to heal the natural world. Launched in 2020, the center was formed to unite Cornell’s leading wildlife health professionals under a common mission: to repair the fractured relationship between people and nature.
CVM staff and students treating a pelican by Jonathan King

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center has launched a new Student Support Fund for off-campus apprenticeships with free-ranging or captive wildlife, on-campus wildlife research, and student travel to present at professional conferences on wildlife health and conservation.
Veterinary students examining a sedated jaguar at the Belize Zoo.

Cornell veterinary students reflect on their experience this past summer in Cornell's International Experience in Wildlife Health and Conservation course, which provided hands-on learning in zoological and conservation medicine at the Belize Zoo.
Dr. Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond with kanga blog thumbnail

News

For Cornell alumnus Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond, a career in conservation may have been an inevitability. An animal lover for as long as he can remember, Dr. Dvornicky-Raymond recalls, “as I grew up and was attending zoos and learning more about the world, I came to realize that all of the animals that I loved and was so interested in were disappearing. So I always knew I wanted to figure out a way to help them.”
A Red-tailed Hawk being treated at the wildlife hospital

Birds of prey are in trouble, according to a recent study by Cornell researchers. Rodenticides are bad news for wildlife; poisoned rodents may not die immediately and are more likely to be eaten by raptors like red-tailed hawks, passing on the poison to them.
An adult crow receiving care at the wildlife hospital

West Nile virus may no longer be a death sentence to crows. In a new study from the College of Veterinary Medicine, wildlife experts describe successfully treating and releasing five American crows infected with the deadly disease, These are the first known crows to survive West Nile virus.
Team Crab PLT in the Galápagos

The equatorial sun is fierce and radiates off the field of lava rocks that make up the rugged shoreline. My co-investigators and I are swiftly processing twenty Sally Lightfoot crabs that were collected from the nearby rocks. For each crab we individually identify them, measure dimensions, obtain a body weight, perform a physical exam, and count a heart rate to assess their health....
A Red-tailed Hawk shown carrying prey in talons

For Your Information

Anticoagulant rodenticides continue to be used across the U.S. as a method for controlling pest rodent species. As a consequence, wild birds of prey are exposed to these toxicants by eating poisoned prey items.
A Snow goose being treated at Cornell's wildlife hospital

Each spring, large flocks of snow geese make their annual trek from the south back up to their Arctic breeding grounds. One goose’s journey was interrupted, however, by an increasingly common threat to wildlife — lead toxicity. 

After a decade of planning and over a year of construction, the Rosamond Gifford Zoo opened their new animal health center with the goal of providing education and transparency to visitors at the zoo.