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In the News

A tri-colored bat being examined.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing listing the tricolored bat as endangered after its population declined due to white-nose syndrome. Cornell's Dr. Elizabeth Buckles notes that the tricolored bat in particular has been in trouble for a long time and that this decision is long overdue.
An image of a waterfall reflected in a globe made of glass.

In a large-scale effort to reduce human infectious diseases and conserve human and animal life, researchers have collated and reviewed the evidence for 46 solutions that aim to advance the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.
An elephant shown behind a fence.

Cornell and regional partners have, over many years of collaboration, developed innovative ways to resolve conflicts at the wildlife-livestock interface in the interest of advancing transfrontier conservation and sustainable economic development.
A mature Bald Eagle sitting in a tree by Christine Bogdanowicz

A bald eagle surprised fellow travelers as it was spotted being taken through a TSA checkpoint at a U.S. airport. Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler, who led a study showing bald eagles' population size is being threatened by lead poisoning, comments, "Even though the population seems like it's recovered, some perturbation could come along that could cause eagles to decline again."
A Bottlenose dolphin shown jumping out of the water

Results of a recent study, including Cornell veterinary student Michelle Greenfield, DVM '23, as first author, indicate that some relationships established by common bottlenose dolphin calves are maintained into their juvenile stages.
Dr. Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond with kanga blog thumbnail

News

For Cornell alumnus Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond, a career in conservation may have been an inevitability. An animal lover for as long as he can remember, Dr. Dvornicky-Raymond recalls, “as I grew up and was attending zoos and learning more about the world, I came to realize that all of the animals that I loved and was so interested in were disappearing. So I always knew I wanted to figure out a way to help them.”
Endangered animals shown in cages

Decision-makers discussing landmark agreements on health and biodiversity must include four actions to reduce the risk of animals and people exchanging viruses.
A brochure that's an example of communication materials explaining zoonotic diseases.

This spring, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine students in the class Veterinary Practice: Public Health created a variety of communication materials explaining zoonotic diseases.
A Red-tailed Hawk being treated at the wildlife hospital

Birds of prey are in trouble, according to a recent study by Cornell researchers. Rodenticides are bad news for wildlife; poisoned rodents may not die immediately and are more likely to be eaten by raptors like red-tailed hawks, passing on the poison to them.