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In the News

A student drawing that illustrates fish pathology

Cornell veterinary student Laura Donohue, DVM '22, showcases her artistic talent and passion for animals in a new book, "Wildlife Health and Disease in Conservation," featuring >100 illustrations depicting common wildlife disease cycles and their social, cultural and economic influences.
Earth Day infographic on actions we can take to help the planet

Blog

Today is Earth Day! There are many ways to invest in our planet, and together, we can work to secure a healthier future for wildlife, people, and planet today and every day!
Two chickens in a barnyard

Dr. Elizabeth Buckles, assistant clinical professor and wildlife pathologist at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, says it's important to keep chickens and turkeys away from wild birds to prevent the H5N1 virus from entering our food supply.
Student Eric Teplitz, D.V.M ’20, Ph.D. Candidate

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Our scientists work around the world to improve public health outcomes, strengthen local and international food systems, and catalyze wildlife conservation efforts— all while training the next generation of One Health professionals. Find out how you can support making our world safer and healthier for all.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.
Quarry lake

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine launched its new Department of Public and Ecosystem Health, linking interdisciplinary One Health work that benefits the well-being of people, animals and the environment.
An Ethiopian wolf image by Charles J. Sharp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)

While global attention is of course currently focused on COVID-19 and other diseases that jump from animals to people, people and domestic animals can also spread disease to wildlife, notes the Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky. 
One Health Symposium logo

The Veterinary One Health Association (VOHA) at Cornell hosted its annual symposium featuring guest speakers, special lectures and a virtual poster session covering One Health issues.

History is pockmarked with the scars of past zoonotic outbreaks. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky discusses how global cooperation in a unified “one health” effort is needed to prevent the next pandemic.