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A Bengal Tiger looking very regal by Blake Meyer

For Your Information

Tigers are among the most charismatic of endangered species and garner significant conservation attention. However, their evolutionary history and genomic variation remains poorly known, especially for Indian tigers. With 70% of the world's wild tigers living in India, such knowledge is critical for their conservation.
Cornell Day of Data 2021: Scholarships through Collaboration banner

The annual Cornell Day of Data brings together professors, researchers and students across the university to share techniques, tools and insights in working with data. This year's theme is "Scholarship through Collaboration."
Siberian tiger walking in snow

In this commentary, Cornell's Dr. Martin Gilbert and WCS's Dale Miquelle argue that it is incumbent upon science-based conservation agencies to consider vaccinating high-risk tiger populations where epidemiological research indicates that it is necessary to mitigate extinction risks.
Tiger sitting in grass

A team led by Cornell's Dr. Martin Gilbert has shown that vaccinating endangered Amur tigers is the only viable method of protecting the species from canine distemper virus, which causes respiratory and neurological infections in tigers and other carnivores.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Two Amur Tigers resting in the snow; photo provided by Wildlife Conservation Society

We vaccinate our dogs against the canine distemper virus, but it also affects wildlife, including the rare Amur tiger. Our own Dr. Martin Gilbert’s pioneering work shows how vaccinating Amur tigers against canine distemper virus could reduce their risk of extinction.
Siberian Tiger standing in snow

New research published by Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Martin Gilbert in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that vaccination of endangered Amur (Siberian) tigers is the only practical strategy to protect these big cats from a dangerous disease in their natural habitat in the Russian Far East.
Amir Sadaula collecting blood from an immobilized rhino.

As I write this in summer 2020, it is almost six months since the first reports that a mysterious new pathogen was emerging in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Given the pandemic that ensued, few of us remain unaware of the omnipotent reach of wildlife-origin microbes to disrupt our health, our economies and our liberty....
Flock of sheep with farmer in Asia

For Your Information

Growing evidence suggests that multiple wildlife species can be infected with peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), with important consequences for the potential maintenance of PPRV in communities of susceptible hosts, and the threat that PPRV may pose to the conservation of wildlife populations and resilience of ecosystems.
Vet student with rhino

At a critical time for the future of life on Earth, The College of Veterinary Medicine announces the establishment of the Cornell Wildlife Health Center. The new center focuses on catalyzing multidisciplinary collaboration to address wildlife health challenges worldwide, while immersing students in unique learning experiences at home and abroad.