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An image of a waterfall reflected in a globe made of glass.

In a large-scale effort to reduce human infectious diseases and conserve human and animal life, researchers have collated and reviewed the evidence for 46 solutions that aim to advance the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.
Endangered animals shown in cages

Decision-makers discussing landmark agreements on health and biodiversity must include four actions to reduce the risk of animals and people exchanging viruses.
A brochure that's an example of communication materials explaining zoonotic diseases.

This spring, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine students in the class Veterinary Practice: Public Health created a variety of communication materials explaining zoonotic diseases.
A sail-driven fishing boat shown in open water

Cornell's Dr. Kathryn Fiorella seeks to ensure the health of fisheries by taking into account the nutritional and livelihood needs of the people who depend on them.

Raina Plowright, a world-renowned ecologist and epidemiologist who studies the mechanisms that drive the spillover of pathogens between species, has joined the College of Veterinary Medicine. Her transdisciplinary work demonstrates that preserving and restoring wildlife habitats can stop pathogen spillover by minimizing contact between infected wildlife and potentially susceptible livestock or human hosts. 
Honeybee hovering near a sunflower

I have an affinity for bees. I came by it honestly: my grandfather was a beekeeper. Upon his death decades ago, I was allowed to take a few small keepsakes from his home; one of my choices was his beekeeping book, “The Hive and the Honey Bee, Edited by Roy A. Grout.” His copy was printed in 1954, but the history of the book dates a 101 years earlier (authored by Langstroth) and continued through 2015 (edited by Graham)....
Earth Day infographic on actions we can take to help the planet

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Today is Earth Day! There are many ways to invest in our planet, and together, we can work to secure a healthier future for wildlife, people, and planet today and every day!
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.
Quarry lake

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine launched its new Department of Public and Ecosystem Health, linking interdisciplinary One Health work that benefits the well-being of people, animals and the environment.