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Ben Jakobek with a sedated Moose in snow

Blog

If Dr. Benjamin Jakobek decides to write a book, I will be first in line to buy it. As he tells me about some of the projects he’s been a part of, including capturing and collaring muskox in Nunavik and working to transport caribou to a protected environment, he is a reminder to all of us aspiring veterinarians that we will one day have the capability and arguably, the responsibility, to help protect wild animals and places around the world....
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
Robin Radcliffe with rhino

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Cornell veterinary student Colleen Sorge, DVM '24, speaks with Cornell Wildlife Veterinarian Dr. Robin Radcliffe about his career in wildlife health and conservation.
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.
Examining a rhino in mid-transport as part of a study on the technique’s health impacts. (Photo courtesy of Robin Radcliffe)

Cornell's Dr. Robin Radcliffe and his research team won a 2021 Ig Nobel for their work in Namibia on methods of relocating black rhinos—which is often vital to protect the critically endangered species from poachers.
Rhino and helicopter from Namibian Ministry of the Environment, Forestry, and Tourism

The Wildlife Disease Association highlights Cornell wildlife veterinarian Dr. Robin Radcliffe and his team, who were awarded an Ig Nobel prize for their rhino health research. 
Ig Nobel prize for rhino tranportation video screenshot

Video

Watch the announcement of this year's Ig Nobel Transportation Prize, awarded to a Cornell-led team for their research on whether it's safer for rhinos to be transported upside-down or on their side.  
Rhino being hung upside down for transportation

A Cornell-led study that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals to aid conservation efforts has been awarded one of this year's Ig Nobel prizes.
A collage of endangered species that includes three big cats, elephant and rhino

The third Friday of May is Endangered Species Day. Primarily as a result of human activities, our planet’s biodiversity is shrinking at an unprecedented rate. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center is proud to support a diverse range of species and ecosystems through our work.
Rhino being hung upside down for transportation

A research team led by Cornell's Dr. Robin Radcliffe found that airlifting critically endangered black rhinos upside down when moving them away from poaching hotspots is better for rhino health than lying them down on stretchers.