Skip to main content

In the News

Rhino and helicopter from Namibian Ministry of the Environment, Forestry, and Tourism

The Wildlife Disease Association highlights Cornell wildlife veterinarian Dr. Robin Radcliffe and his team, who were awarded an Ig Nobel prize for their rhino health research. 
Ig Nobel prize for rhino tranportation video screenshot

Video

Watch the announcement of this year's Ig Nobel Transportation Prize, awarded to a Cornell-led team for their research on whether it's safer for rhinos to be transported upside-down or on their side.  
Rhino being hung upside down for transportation

A Cornell-led study that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals to aid conservation efforts has been awarded one of this year's Ig Nobel prizes.
A collage of endangered species that includes three big cats, elephant and rhino

The third Friday of May is Endangered Species Day. Primarily as a result of human activities, our planet’s biodiversity is shrinking at an unprecedented rate. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center is proud to support a diverse range of species and ecosystems through our work.
Rhino being hung upside down for transportation

A research team led by Cornell's Dr. Robin Radcliffe found that airlifting critically endangered black rhinos upside down when moving them away from poaching hotspots is better for rhino health than lying them down on stretchers.
Rhino hanging upside down from helicopter

In an effort to save endangered rhinos, Cornell researchers and Namibian colleagues found that transporting rhinos upside down from helicopters was safe and quick.
Rhino hanging upside down

To keep rhinos safe from poaching and to distribute individuals across habitats, management teams must often tranquilize rhinos in remote areas that cannot be accessed by roads — this often leaves one option: airlifting them out via helicopter.
Rhino hanging upside down

For Your Information

In a new study published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine scientists have found that when moving endangered rhinoceroses in an effort to save the species, hanging them upside down by their feet is the safest way to go.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Cornell student teaching children about the role sea birds play in the ecosystem

Blog

Cornell veterinary student Alexander Levitskiy ’24 reflects on his experience working in Indonesia last summer as part of an international program that exposes students to wildlife conservation work.