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In the News

A collage of endangered species that includes three big cats, elephant and rhino

The third Friday of May is Endangered Species Day. Primarily as a result of human activities, our planet’s biodiversity is shrinking at an unprecedented rate. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center is proud to support a diverse range of species and ecosystems through our work.
Jaguar dental extraction © William Fugina

Research analyzing the prevalence of dental diseases in captive jaguars in Belize was recently published by Lindsey Schneider, DVM ’13, and a team of veterinary colleagues in the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. Dr. Schneider completed the research during her residency in Dentistry and Oral Surgery at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.
Juvenile Gyrfalcon being released

As temperatures warm, pathogens that were once unable to survive the harsh weather conditions of the far north are now encroaching northward and could become a substantial problem for Gyrfalcons.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Rings in water

Veterinary toxicologist Dr. Karyn Bischoff and other experts discuss the problem with single-use plastics and how they are impacting the health of the planet.
Malayan tiger

The Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University conducted initial COVID-19 testing of samples from a Bronx Zoo tiger. It is believed to be the first known case of an animal infected with SARS-Cov-2 in the U.S. and the first tiger worldwide.
A Double-Crested Cormorant seen perched in a tree

The news is depressing. A recently released article in Science by my colleagues at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology shows that 3 billion birds have vanished in the lasts 50 years….
A small bat shown being gently held in hand

Cornell's wildlife experts weigh-in on the impact of white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has been devastating bat populations across North America, with a mortality rate that can often reach 90 to 100 percent.
A porcupine shown on a rocky substrate

Cornell's Dr. Laura Goodman helped to identify a new deadly fungal disease in porcupines, adding to the list of species hit by such outbreaks. The newly discovered fungal disease is zoonotic, which means it can be passed on to humans, although there are no documented cases of this occurring.