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Team Crab PLT in the Galápagos

The equatorial sun is fierce and radiates off the field of lava rocks that make up the rugged shoreline. My co-investigators and I are swiftly processing twenty Sally Lightfoot crabs that were collected from the nearby rocks. For each crab we individually identify them, measure dimensions, obtain a body weight, perform a physical exam, and count a heart rate to assess their health....
A Red-tailed Hawk shown carrying prey in talons

For Your Information

Anticoagulant rodenticides continue to be used across the U.S. as a method for controlling pest rodent species. As a consequence, wild birds of prey are exposed to these toxicants by eating poisoned prey items.
Honeybee hovering near a sunflower

I have an affinity for bees. I came by it honestly: my grandfather was a beekeeper. Upon his death decades ago, I was allowed to take a few small keepsakes from his home; one of my choices was his beekeeping book, “The Hive and the Honey Bee, Edited by Roy A. Grout.” His copy was printed in 1954, but the history of the book dates a 101 years earlier (authored by Langstroth) and continued through 2015 (edited by Graham)....
A student drawing that illustrates fish pathology

Cornell veterinary student Laura Donohue, DVM '22, showcases her artistic talent and passion for animals in a new book, "Wildlife Health and Disease in Conservation," featuring >100 illustrations depicting common wildlife disease cycles and their social, cultural and economic influences.
Bald eagle about to land on a dead tree.

With millions of chickens on commercial poultry farms sickened and dying from a highly virulent strain of avian flu in recent months, it might have escaped notice that some of the nation’s most stunning wild birds have also been felled by the virus.
Two chickens in a barnyard

Dr. Elizabeth Buckles, assistant clinical professor and wildlife pathologist at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, says it's important to keep chickens and turkeys away from wild birds to prevent the H5N1 virus from entering our food supply.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
WildCats spotlight podcast thumbnail image showing a tiger with a face mask around it's head

Podcast

Listen to our Wild Carnivore Health Specialist Dr. Martin Gilbert and other big cat conservationists discuss the impacts of infectious diseases on tiger populations in the first episode of WildCats Pawcast, a brand-new podcast from WildCats Conservation Alliance.
Elizabeth Bunting at her desk by Ryan Young-Cornell University

The New York State Wildlife Health Program is a key partnership between Cornell and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The program coordinates responses when disease strikes New York’s wild animals and it helps prevent outbreaks, in domestic animals and people too, by translating data into policy.
Two Bald Eagles shown at their nest

Blog

Long before I was aware of the problem, professionals of veterinary medicine and pathology treated, rehabilitated, or necropsied ill, dying, or dead bald eagles. The wild birds had been presented for care after they ingested lead fragments from spent ammunition....