Skip to main content

In the News

A Bald Eagle in flight

As the number of American bald eagles has continued to soar in recent years, Cornell researchers are now warning the species’ reemergence is being threatened by lead poisoning from gun ammunition. 
Bald Eagle radiograph from Avian Haven

Bald eagle populations have slowly recovered from near devastation after the government banned DDT in 1972, but another ongoing issue has weakened that rebound – lead poisoning from gunshot ammunition.
A Bald Eagle shown eating at a deer carcass

For Your Information

Bald eagles are considered a recovery success in the U.S. after rebounding from near extirpation due to widespread use of DDT. Although abundances of bald eagles have increased since DDT was banned, other contaminants have remained in the environment with unknown influence on eagle population trends.
A Fisher shown in a tree

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently renewed the New York State Wildlife Health Program for $6.4 million over five years. This partnership has enabled Cornell to work with the state’s wildlife biologists on threats that affect all of New York's wildlife.
Niagara River Lake trout by Christine Bogdanowicz

Using the most technologically advanced test to make a diagnosis might seem like a logical move, but a new commentary paper co-authored by Cornell Aquatics Scientist Dr. Rod Getchell warns veterinary clinicians and researchers that a diagnosis cannot rely on tests alone.
A Black-footed ferret shown looking back

By testing easier-to-study coyotes, Cornell researchers, in collaboration with the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, have identified a range of lethal diseases threatening black-footed ferrets – one of the most endangered animals in North America.
Red fox with kit by Christine Bogdanowicz news thumbnail

There is astonishing diversity in how mammal mothers undergo pregnancy and birth. Dr. Alexander Travis, a Cornell reproductive biologist, describes how 'the birds and the bees' work for these unique animals.  
Nurdles-plastic gravel by Barbara Agnew

One word: nurdles. Nurdles are plastic pellets, approximately the size and shape of lentils or split peas. Nurdles are manufactured, and then shipped to companies across the planet to be made into other things — other plastic things....
A collage of endangered species that includes three big cats, elephant and rhino

The third Friday of May is Endangered Species Day. Primarily as a result of human activities, our planet’s biodiversity is shrinking at an unprecedented rate. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center is proud to support a diverse range of species and ecosystems through our work.
Jaguar dental extraction © William Fugina

Research analyzing the prevalence of dental diseases in captive jaguars in Belize was recently published by Lindsey Schneider, DVM ’13, and a team of veterinary colleagues in the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. Dr. Schneider completed the research during her residency in Dentistry and Oral Surgery at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.