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In the News

A Double-Crested Cormorant seen perched in a tree

The news is depressing. A recently released article in Science by my colleagues at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology shows that 3 billion birds have vanished in the lasts 50 years….
A small bat shown being gently held in hand

Cornell's wildlife experts weigh-in on the impact of white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has been devastating bat populations across North America, with a mortality rate that can often reach 90 to 100 percent.
A porcupine shown on a rocky substrate

Cornell's Dr. Laura Goodman helped to identify a new deadly fungal disease in porcupines, adding to the list of species hit by such outbreaks. The newly discovered fungal disease is zoonotic, which means it can be passed on to humans, although there are no documented cases of this occurring.
Histo slide of a newt's skin; examples of a normal and necrosis affected sample

When the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab investigates mortalities in wildlife, our specially trained pathologists use diagnostic tools to crack the case....
A taiga tick shown on a leaf

A newly discovered virus has been found infecting people in China, and it may be transmitted by ticks, according to a new report.
A juvenile bald eagle shown on an exam table for a necropsy to begin

What do you call the post-mortem examination of an animal? The appropriate term is “necropsy,” derived from necro (“death”)….
image of young dog

Cornell scientists discovered that a young dog imported from South Korea into Canada brought along a dangerous hitchhiker: the Asia-1 strain of canine distemper virus, which had never before been reported in North America. If the virus comes into contact with wildlife, it may take a serious toll on wild carnivore populations.
Bald Eagle

The mystery behind the deaths of 13 bald eagles found in a Maryland field has recently been solved by investigators: the birds were poisoned with the pesticide carbofuran, which came under scrutiny three decades ago for killing an estimated two million birds a year.
Fox in a field

In this feature article, Wildlife Watchers, learn how Cornell Wildlife Heatlh Center scientists are turning discoveries into real-world solutions, and how our research and surveillance protects nature across New York State.