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Quarry lake

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine launched its new Department of Public and Ecosystem Health, linking interdisciplinary One Health work that benefits the well-being of people, animals and the environment.
An Ethiopian wolf image by Charles J. Sharp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)

While global attention is of course currently focused on COVID-19 and other diseases that jump from animals to people, people and domestic animals can also spread disease to wildlife, notes the Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky. 
One Health Symposium logo

The Veterinary One Health Association (VOHA) at Cornell hosted its annual symposium featuring guest speakers, special lectures and a virtual poster session covering One Health issues.

History is pockmarked with the scars of past zoonotic outbreaks. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky discusses how global cooperation in a unified “one health” effort is needed to prevent the next pandemic.
ʻAkiapōlāʻau (Hemignathus wilsoni) is an endangered Hawaiʻi honeycreeper species

Dr. Katherine McClure, a quantitative disease ecologist, has been working with Birds, Not Mosquitoes as a Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability postdoctoral fellow with the Cornell Wildlife Health Center to develop and evaluate incompatible insect technique (IIT) release strategies to help save Hawai‘i’s native bird populations from avian malaria.
A camel being attended to by a vet in hazmat suit

Cornell's Dr. Steve Osofsky and colleagues reemphasize that a One Health approach is urgently needed to prevent future pandemics — simultaneously addressing human, animal and ecosystem health — protecting humanity and nature.
Nurdles-plastic gravel by Barbara Agnew

One word: nurdles. Nurdles are plastic pellets, approximately the size and shape of lentils or split peas. Nurdles are manufactured, and then shipped to companies across the planet to be made into other things — other plastic things....
Sheep being loaded onto trucks from the sale yards. Australia, 2013, by Jo-Anne McArthur

The COVID-19 pandemic is the latest reminder that human interactions with the animal world are fraught with danger. Dr. Steve Osofsky describes how he would like to see an international treaty that mitigates human activities that create opportunities for animal viruses to infect humans.
A collage of recent alumni with various animals

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center is proud to celebrate some of the latest achievements of recent graduates from the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine pursuing career paths in wildlife conservation and One Health.
Pandemic Conference Feature poster that includes a portrait of Jane Goodall

An international conference co-hosted by Cornell University and featuring celebrated conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall heard how COVID-19 provides a wake-up call concerning the unsustainable way we treat the natural world.