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Panelist speakers at Symposium

Future pandemics can be averted if the world’s governments eliminate unnecessary wildlife trade and adopt holistic One Health approaches, according to experts at a February 23 virtual conference, hosted by Cornell and WWF.
Exploring ways to prevent pandemics symposium

Announcement

Join Cornell and WWF on Tuesday, February 23, from 9:00 a.m. to noon EST for a virtual dialogue with leading experts in public health and conservation on ways to foster global collaboration to mitigate zoonotic disease risks and prevent pandemics. Moderated by Thomas L. Friedman of The New York Times with special guest speaker Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE, UN Messenger of Peace.   
Coronavirus

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky observes that the recent World Health Organization report on the origins of COVID-19 reinforces what we’ve long known.
Jane Goodall

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center, Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability, and the World Wildlife Fund will host a free, virtual conference on February 23, focused on humans, wildlife and the prevention of future pandemics. The keynote address will be given by Jane Goodall, trailblazing conservationist and UN Messenger of Peace.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Cornell researchers participate in a "One Health Perspectives" session

Cornell researchers participated in an open discussion during the “One Health Perspectives” session as part of the COVID-19 Summit, a two-day event featuring researchers from across Cornell.
Medical worker wearing face mask and eye shield

The history of an approach to health to prevent future pandemics.
Birds in marketplace

A bipartisan bill, the Preventing Future Pandemics Act, would direct the State Department to work with international partners to shut down commercial wildlife markets, end the trade in live wildlife for human consumption and stop the associated wildlife trade, end the import, export, and sale of live wildlife for human consumption in the United States, and phase out demand for wildlife as a food source.
Bat hanging from tree

For Your Information

The mixing of multiple coronaviruses, and their apparent amplification along the wildlife supply chain into restaurants, suggests maximal risk for end consumers and likely underpins the mechanisms of zoonotic spillover to people.
Hawai'ian Apapane bird with mosquito in eye

Vector-borne infectious diseases pose substantial threats to human health and the conservation of wildlife. Avian malaria in Hawai‘i provides an example of the devastation caused by the emergence and spread of such diseases within susceptible host populations.