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Team Crab PLT in the Galápagos

The equatorial sun is fierce and radiates off the field of lava rocks that make up the rugged shoreline. My co-investigators and I are swiftly processing twenty Sally Lightfoot crabs that were collected from the nearby rocks. For each crab we individually identify them, measure dimensions, obtain a body weight, perform a physical exam, and count a heart rate to assess their health....
A sail-driven fishing boat shown in open water

Cornell's Dr. Kathryn Fiorella seeks to ensure the health of fisheries by taking into account the nutritional and livelihood needs of the people who depend on them.

Raina Plowright, a world-renowned ecologist and epidemiologist who studies the mechanisms that drive the spillover of pathogens between species, has joined the College of Veterinary Medicine. Her transdisciplinary work demonstrates that preserving and restoring wildlife habitats can stop pathogen spillover by minimizing contact between infected wildlife and potentially susceptible livestock or human hosts. 
Honeybee hovering near a sunflower

I have an affinity for bees. I came by it honestly: my grandfather was a beekeeper. Upon his death decades ago, I was allowed to take a few small keepsakes from his home; one of my choices was his beekeeping book, “The Hive and the Honey Bee, Edited by Roy A. Grout.” His copy was printed in 1954, but the history of the book dates a 101 years earlier (authored by Langstroth) and continued through 2015 (edited by Graham)....
A student drawing that illustrates fish pathology

Cornell veterinary student Laura Donohue, DVM '22, showcases her artistic talent and passion for animals in a new book, "Wildlife Health and Disease in Conservation," featuring >100 illustrations depicting common wildlife disease cycles and their social, cultural and economic influences.
Earth Day infographic on actions we can take to help the planet

Blog

Today is Earth Day! There are many ways to invest in our planet, and together, we can work to secure a healthier future for wildlife, people, and planet today and every day!
Two chickens in a barnyard

Dr. Elizabeth Buckles, assistant clinical professor and wildlife pathologist at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, says it's important to keep chickens and turkeys away from wild birds to prevent the H5N1 virus from entering our food supply.
Student Eric Teplitz, D.V.M ’20, Ph.D. Candidate

Announcement

Our scientists work around the world to improve public health outcomes, strengthen local and international food systems, and catalyze wildlife conservation efforts— all while training the next generation of One Health professionals. Find out how you can support making our world safer and healthier for all.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.