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An adult crow receiving care at the wildlife hospital

West Nile virus may no longer be a death sentence to crows. In a new study from the College of Veterinary Medicine, wildlife experts describe successfully treating and releasing five American crows infected with the deadly disease, These are the first known crows to survive West Nile virus.
A Red-tailed Hawk shown carrying prey in talons

For Your Information

Anticoagulant rodenticides continue to be used across the U.S. as a method for controlling pest rodent species. As a consequence, wild birds of prey are exposed to these toxicants by eating poisoned prey items.
A Snow goose being treated at Cornell's wildlife hospital

Each spring, large flocks of snow geese make their annual trek from the south back up to their Arctic breeding grounds. One goose’s journey was interrupted, however, by an increasingly common threat to wildlife — lead toxicity. 
A Snow goose being treated at Cornell's wildlife hospital

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This female snow goose came to the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital for lead toxicity. She couldn’t keep up with her flock on its migration north because she was too sick to fly. The Cornell team nursed her back to health and she was released back into the wild.
An Eastern Phoebe being treated at the wildlife hospital

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An eastern phoebe songbird was found in a glue trap meant to capture insects and was taken to Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital for treatment.
An Eastern Phoebe being treated at the wildlife hospital

Found in a glue trap meant to capture insects, an eastern phoebe songbird was taken to Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital after its rescuers attempted to free the creature from the powerful adhesive.
A tiny kit fox being cared for at the wildlife hospital

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A tiny red fox kit was recently treated for a swollen paw at Cornell's Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital. The fox is expected to make a full recovery.
A tiny kit fox being cared for at the wildlife hospital

A tiny red fox kit is getting world-class care at Cornell University’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital. The four-to-six-week old baby was found with her paw caught in a plastic rat trap and Cornell’s wildlife health team is helping to heal the fox’s swollen paw and get the baby back to full health.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.