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Dr. Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond with kanga blog thumbnail

News

For Cornell alumnus Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond, a career in conservation may have been an inevitability. An animal lover for as long as he can remember, Dr. Dvornicky-Raymond recalls, “as I grew up and was attending zoos and learning more about the world, I came to realize that all of the animals that I loved and was so interested in were disappearing. So I always knew I wanted to figure out a way to help them.”
A Red-tailed Hawk being treated at the wildlife hospital

Birds of prey are in trouble, according to a recent study by Cornell researchers. Rodenticides are bad news for wildlife; poisoned rodents may not die immediately and are more likely to be eaten by raptors like red-tailed hawks, passing on the poison to them.
A Red-tailed Hawk shown carrying prey in talons

For Your Information

Anticoagulant rodenticides continue to be used across the U.S. as a method for controlling pest rodent species. As a consequence, wild birds of prey are exposed to these toxicants by eating poisoned prey items.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
Penguin shown in the water

Blog

As an aspiring veterinarian interested in zoological medicine, I have tried my best to take advantage of all zoo and wildlife opportunities available to me. When I think about the kind of veterinary career I want to have, it is one where I can combine my interests in conservation, international travel and cultural immersion....
Lioness on operating table

A big cat got the lion’s share of attention when her keepers brought her to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA). There, Ntsumi the white African lioness was diagnosed with an intestinal mass that veterinarians surgically removed.
Cornell veterinarian examines a captive elephant as vet students look on

A 23-year partnership between Syracuse’s Rosamond Gifford Zoo and Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine provides care for endangered species while giving veterinarians and students specialized training.
A Reticulated Python shown on the operating table at Cornell

A scan performed at Cornell University Hospital for Animals aided veterinarians in their treatment of a python from Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York.
Dr. Noha Abou-Madi examines a Red panda at the Syracuse Zoo

Learn how the symbiotic 22-year partnership between Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine and the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York has been mutually beneficial to wildlife, students, and scientists alike.
Veterinary clinic

The residents of the Belize Zoo have a brand-new veterinary clinic that will serve the medical needs of everyone from Sparks the tapir to Chiqui the jaguar. Members of the College of Veterinary Medicine celebrated this milestone with zoo staff when the clinic opened this summer.