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In the News

A Moose shown walking in the woods.

Moose returned to New York in the 1980s, but their population hasn’t grown as scientists expected. Research teams, including those at Cornell University and the Shingle Shanty Preserve and Research Station, are studying whether ecological and/or disease issues are causing this stagnation in moose population growth.
Moose tracking courtesy of NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

Podcast

In this podcast, Dr. Krysten Schuler, a wildlife disease ecologist and co-director of the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab, and Jen Grauer, a Cornell PhD student, discuss their latest project to track and study wild moose, led by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Bull Moose

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced the start of a new moose research project in the Adirondack region. They will be working with partners, including Cornell, to assess moose health and population.
Bull Moose

Working closely with Cornell Wildlife Health Center experts, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation released a final plan to minimize the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease impacting wild deer and moose.
moose in a field

College of Veterinary Medicine researchers and partners are evaluating the health of moose populations across the New York Adirondacks region. By screening animals for infectious diseases and developing health indicators for evaluation over time, we can assess factors key for ensuring the population's long-term viability.