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A 4-toed salamander by Alex Roukis shown sitting on top of a leaf

For Your Information

Successful conservation efforts for threatened species depend on accurate characterization of their distribution, habitat use, and threats. Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring can provide a sensitive and noninvasive alternative to traditional surveillance techniques.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.
Four-toed salamander byTodd Pierson

Environmental DNA techniques can detect a deadly virus in amphibian ponds, giving wildlife managers critical information about how to best protect vulnerable amphibian species.
Cornell Red-tailed Hawk in flight by Christine Bogdanowicz 2020

The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has released its 2020 Annual Report, detailing its progress in its key strategic priority areas, including "Advances in Animal, Human and Ecosystem Health."
Amphibian close-up

Video

The One Health concept recognizes that the health of people is connected to that of animals and the environment. Amphibians have been documented to help keep forests healthy while also serving as key indicators of water quality.
Beck Turcios in lab

Blog

Cornell veterinary student Beck Turcios ‘21 joined the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab’s eDNA project and learned novel diagnostic techniques and new approaches to preserving local salamander biodiversity.