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In the News

A dog sitting in the grass

While the coronavirus pandemic reinvigorated the spotlight on One Health, the focus has generally been on wildlife and livestock. A study by Cornell researchers show that companion animals or peri-domestic wildlife can act as notable reservoirs for pathogens that may affect human health as well.
K. Lisa Yang

A transformational gift from philanthropist and Cornell alumna K. Lisa Yang ’74 will endow and rename the Cornell Wildlife Health Center as the Cornell K. Lisa Yang Center for Wildlife Health at the College of Veterinary Medicine.
A Red Fox shown trotting in a field.

Cornell researchers have discovered coronaviruses in wild carnivores that had never been reported in these species before.
A domestic cat shown outside.

Cats occupy a distinct position in the ecological networks of companion animals, humans and peri-domestic species – wild and feral animals living near human habitations – according to a recent review article by a team of Cornell researchers.
Red fox family standing in front of an old barn by Christine Bogdanowicz

For Your Information

This new paper by Cornell researchers presents background and commentary focusing on companion and peri-domestic animals as disease risk for humans, taking into account the human-animal interface and population dynamics between the animals themselves.
A collage of new Professorships.

In recognition of their outstanding scholarship and service, multiple members of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine faculty have been granted named professorships, including Drs. Raina Plowright and Gary Whittaker.
Two White-tailed Deer shown in a forest.

A study led by Cornell researchers found that white-tailed deer ­– the most abundant large mammal in North America – are harboring SARS-CoV-2 variants that once widely circulated but are no longer found in humans.
A rhinoceros shown walking by Joel Jerzog/Unsplash

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center continues to enhance synergy among many of Cornell’s wildlife-focused programs, expand student learning opportunities, and capitalize on earnest interdisciplinary approaches to addressing key wildlife conservation and related public health challenges.
A Black-footed ferret shown looking back

By testing easier-to-study coyotes, Cornell researchers, in collaboration with the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, have identified a range of lethal diseases threatening black-footed ferrets – one of the most endangered animals in North America.