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A Bald Eagle in flight

As the number of American bald eagles has continued to soar in recent years, Cornell researchers are now warning the species’ reemergence is being threatened by lead poisoning from gun ammunition. 
Bald Eagle radiograph from Avian Haven

Bald eagle populations have slowly recovered from near devastation after the government banned DDT in 1972, but another ongoing issue has weakened that rebound – lead poisoning from gunshot ammunition.
A Bald Eagle shown eating at a deer carcass

For Your Information

Bald eagles are considered a recovery success in the U.S. after rebounding from near extirpation due to widespread use of DDT. Although abundances of bald eagles have increased since DDT was banned, other contaminants have remained in the environment with unknown influence on eagle population trends.
Four-toed salamander byTodd Pierson

Environmental DNA techniques can detect a deadly virus in amphibian ponds, giving wildlife managers critical information about how to best protect vulnerable amphibian species.
A portrait of Krysten Schuler

The National Deer Association names Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler as its 2021 Professional Deer Manager of the Year, in recognition of her work to help slow the spread of chronic wasting disease.
A Fisher shown in a tree

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently renewed the New York State Wildlife Health Program for $6.4 million over five years. This partnership has enabled Cornell to work with the state’s wildlife biologists on threats that affect all of New York's wildlife.
Bald Eagles feeding on a carcass left by a hunter by Chelsea Geyer, NYSDEC Wildlife technician

There is no safe level of lead for any wildlife species, and a hunter’s ammunition choice can mean life or death for scavenging wildlife.
Red-tailed Hawk being released back into the wild by Christine Bogdanowicz

For Your Information

By analyzing case records, Cornell researchers helped clarify and quantify the causes for wildlife rehabilitation, species involved, and treatment outcomes.
A Black-footed ferret shown looking back

By testing easier-to-study coyotes, Cornell researchers, in collaboration with the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, have identified a range of lethal diseases threatening black-footed ferrets – one of the most endangered animals in North America.
Krysten Schuler with bear cub courteys of The Wildlife Society news thumbnail

Ten longtime TWS members have been named TWS Fellows for 2021, including Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler. The TWS Fellows Award is given out each year to individuals who have “distinguished themselves through exceptional service” to the profession and have been members of the Society for at least 10 years.