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In the News

Vet student with rhino

At a critical time for the future of life on Earth, The College of Veterinary Medicine announces the establishment of the Cornell Wildlife Health Center. The new center focuses on catalyzing multidisciplinary collaboration to address wildlife health challenges worldwide, while immersing students in unique learning experiences at home and abroad.
Amphibian close-up

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The One Health concept recognizes that the health of people is connected to that of animals and the environment. Amphibians have been documented to help keep forests healthy while also serving as key indicators of water quality.
A small bat shown being gently held in hand

Cornell's wildlife experts weigh-in on the impact of white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has been devastating bat populations across North America, with a mortality rate that can often reach 90 to 100 percent.
Two Gray geese in flight over water

The Cornell Wildlife Health Lab has created StaPOPd, an interactive online tool that helps calculate how many plants or animals need to be introduced into a habitat in order to establish a stable population - a critical piece of information for conservation projects.
A porcupine shown on a rocky substrate

Cornell's Dr. Laura Goodman helped to identify a new deadly fungal disease in porcupines, adding to the list of species hit by such outbreaks. The newly discovered fungal disease is zoonotic, which means it can be passed on to humans, although there are no documented cases of this occurring.
White-tailed deer

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is proposing new regulations to prevent chronic wasting disease (CWD) from entering the state. CWD is a fatal nervous system disease that affects deer, elk, and moose. According to Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler, New York has avoided outbreaks in its deer populations since 2005.
Dr. Kristen Schuler shown providing expert testimony to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources

Cornell's Dr. Krysten Schuler was invited to provide her expert testimony and recommendations on combating chronic wasting disease (CWD) to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources.
Histo slide of a newt's skin; examples of a normal and necrosis affected sample

When the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab investigates mortalities in wildlife, our specially trained pathologists use diagnostic tools to crack the case....