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In the News

Steve Osofsky standing by jeep in Bwabwata National Park

From Ithaca to the plains of southern Africa, the Cornell Wildlife Health Center is working to heal the natural world. Launched in 2020, the center was formed to unite Cornell’s leading wildlife health professionals under a common mission: to repair the fractured relationship between people and nature.
CVM staff and students treating a pelican by Jonathan King

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center has launched a new Student Support Fund for off-campus apprenticeships with free-ranging or captive wildlife, on-campus wildlife research, and student travel to present at professional conferences on wildlife health and conservation.
An adult crow receiving care at the wildlife hospital

West Nile virus may no longer be a death sentence to crows. In a new study from the College of Veterinary Medicine, wildlife experts describe successfully treating and releasing five American crows infected with the deadly disease, These are the first known crows to survive West Nile virus.
A turkey in the care of the wildlife hospital at Cornell

This female wild turkey was treated at Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital after being attacked by a dog. The wild bird is expected to make a full recovery and will be eventually released back into the wild.
Orphaned beaver by Carol Jennings/Cornell Vet

Video

After they lost their parents and developed bacterial enteritis all in the span of a few weeks, a litter of beaver kits came into the care of our team at the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital.
Orphaned beaver by Carol Jennings/Cornell Vet spotlight video thumbnail

A litter of beaver kits traversed more of New York state than most of their species will ever cross in a lifetime. This group of five traveled from the Adirondacks to Western New York, and from there to the Finger Lakes and back in their brief but eventful five weeks of life.
A rare albino porcupine

With 1,750 native wild animals being treated last year, the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital provides free, lifesaving care to a wide range of species and invaluable training for Cornell veterinary students.
Puma sitting near forest

The slowdown in human activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly travel, has created a unique opportunity for scientists to better understand human-wildlife interactions.
One-eyed pelican on hospital table being treated

This juvenile American white pelican — which had only one working eye and was suffering from weakness and parasites — was brought to the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital, making history as the first of its species to be treated there.
Animal receiving care in hospital

For Your Information

The November/December 2019 issue of the Cornell Alumni Magazine features the heroic work of the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital.