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A 4-toed salamander by Alex Roukis shown sitting on top of a leaf

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Successful conservation efforts for threatened species depend on accurate characterization of their distribution, habitat use, and threats. Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring can provide a sensitive and noninvasive alternative to traditional surveillance techniques.
The Cornell ZAWS executive board celebrates a successful day with keynote speaker Dr. Linda Penfold

Cornell’s Zoo and Wildlife Society hosted its first Wildlife Conservation Day Feb. 26, a one-day symposium devoted to education and training for students with an interest in non-domestic species. 
Four-toed salamander byTodd Pierson

Environmental DNA techniques can detect a deadly virus in amphibian ponds, giving wildlife managers critical information about how to best protect vulnerable amphibian species.