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A mule deer contemplates crossing under a wire fence by Christine Bogdanowicz.

For Your Information

A collaborative team, including Cornell Wildlife Health Lab researchers, introduce a software program designed to enable agency personnel to make up-to-date, localized, data-driven predictions regarding the odds of chronic wasting disease detection in surrounding areas after an outbreak is discovered.
Brenda Hanley with a coffe mug.

Blog

I work remotely, so these meetings are often the only human interaction I have all day. But that's not only a function of being remote - it's also a function of the nature of my work. The actual 'doing of the thing' - the math work itself - is often a solo sport....
David reviewing chain of custody forms for our waterfowl contaminant research project.

Blog

As a former undergraduate researcher and now postgraduate research technician with the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab, I have mostly worked on a study of environmental contaminants in hunter-harvested waterfowl....
Biologist Brenda Hanley attaches a transmitter to a free-ranging desert tortoise.

A new method could be used by biologists to estimate the prevalence of disease in free-ranging wildlife and help determine how many samples are needed to detect a disease.
A Bald Eagle in flight by Richard Lee/Unsplash

For Your Information

While the recent population recovery of bald eagles in New York State is a conservation success, evidence from necropsies suggest that ingested lead from ammunition fragments is causing morbidity and mortality to wild eagles.
Portrait of a Black bear

A new paper published by the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab team and partners describes the emergence of mange in New York State black bears.
Black bear walking through coniferous forest

For Your Information

Mange is a parasitic skin disease found in free-ranging wildlife populations and has been increasingly reported in black bears over the last decade in New York State. This paper led by Cornell researchers describes the geographic, seasonal, and demographic factors associated with mange in NYS black bears.
A Bald Eagle shown eating at a deer carcass

The bald eagle’s comeback is one of America’s most famous conservation success stories. But despite the boom in their numbers, bald eagles still face many threats, including poisoning from ingesting lead bullets.
Elizabeth Bunting at her desk by Ryan Young-Cornell University

The New York State Wildlife Health Program is a key partnership between Cornell and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The program coordinates responses when disease strikes New York’s wild animals and it helps prevent outbreaks, in domestic animals and people too, by translating data into policy.
Two Bald Eagles shown at their nest

Blog

Long before I was aware of the problem, professionals of veterinary medicine and pathology treated, rehabilitated, or necropsied ill, dying, or dead bald eagles. The wild birds had been presented for care after they ingested lead fragments from spent ammunition....