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In the News

History is pockmarked with the scars of past zoonotic outbreaks. The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky discusses how global cooperation in a unified “one health” effort is needed to prevent the next pandemic.
ʻAkiapōlāʻau (Hemignathus wilsoni) is an endangered Hawaiʻi honeycreeper species

Dr. Katherine McClure, a quantitative disease ecologist, has been working with Birds, Not Mosquitoes as a Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability postdoctoral fellow with the Cornell Wildlife Health Center to develop and evaluate incompatible insect technique (IIT) release strategies to help save Hawai‘i’s native bird populations from avian malaria.
Elephant standing next to fence

KAZA Ten Years On: World’s largest terrestrial transfrontier conservation area requires true habitat connectivity, as explained in a letter to Science by Cornell’s Dr. Steve Osofsky and WWF Namibia’s Dr. Russell Taylor.
A camel being attended to by a vet in hazmat suit

Cornell's Dr. Steve Osofsky and colleagues reemphasize that a One Health approach is urgently needed to prevent future pandemics — simultaneously addressing human, animal and ecosystem health — protecting humanity and nature.
An African elephant with birds hitching a ride coming towards the photographer

Announcement

Our Beyond Fences program in southern Africa has been awarded a three-year grant from WWF to help facilitate greater collaboration between the wildlife and livestock sectors to resolve previously intractable conflicts between animal disease regulatory needs and transfrontier conservation area objectives.
Sheep being loaded onto trucks from the sale yards. Australia, 2013, by Jo-Anne McArthur

The COVID-19 pandemic is the latest reminder that human interactions with the animal world are fraught with danger. Dr. Steve Osofsky describes how he would like to see an international treaty that mitigates human activities that create opportunities for animal viruses to infect humans.
Pandemic Conference Feature poster that includes a portrait of Jane Goodall

An international conference co-hosted by Cornell University and featuring celebrated conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall heard how COVID-19 provides a wake-up call concerning the unsustainable way we treat the natural world.
Deforestation

Human behaviors have led to "our broken relationship with wild nature," says the Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky in Thomas L. Friedman's latest New York Times column discussing what we must do to prevent the next pandemic.
Exploring ways to prevent pandemics symposium

Video

Watch leading public health and conservation experts discuss how future pandemics can be averted if the world’s governments eliminate unnecessary wildlife trade and adopt holistic One Health approaches. The event was co-hosted by Cornell University and WWF.
Panelist speakers at Symposium

Future pandemics can be averted if the world’s governments eliminate unnecessary wildlife trade and adopt holistic One Health approaches, according to experts at a February 23 virtual conference, hosted by Cornell and WWF.