Skip to main content

Cornell University

Spotlights

A graphical representation of taking care of the Earth, showing two hands clasping the natural world with buildings in the middle

Video

It is no longer possible to separate the health of the planet from the health of its people. Disease patterns are changing as the climate does, and human health is at risk from loss of biodiversity, depleted water supplies, environmental toxins, and collapsing food systems. 
An adult elephant with two young elephants following behind.

Video

Our team has been working in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area to reduce wildlife-livestock conflict, improve community livelihoods, and restore ancient wildlife migration pathways, including those of Africa’s largest remaining population of elephants (~220,000). This video was taken by Cornell Wildlife Health Center Dr. Steve Osofsky.
A portrait of Steve Osofsky

Video

Cornell Wildlife Health Center director Dr. Steve Osofsky takes you on a brief tour of our One Health work around the world.
Ben Jakobek with a sedated Moose in snow

News

If Dr. Benjamin Jakobek decides to write a book, I will be first in line to buy it. As he tells me about some of the projects he’s been a part of, including capturing and collaring muskox in Nunavik and working to transport caribou to a protected environment, he is a reminder to all of us aspiring veterinarians that we will one day have the capability and arguably, the responsibility, to help protect wild animals and places around the world....
Black bear walking through coniferous forest

For Your Information

Mange is a parasitic skin disease found in free-ranging wildlife populations and has been increasingly reported in black bears over the last decade in New York State. This paper led by Cornell researchers describes the geographic, seasonal, and demographic factors associated with mange in NYS black bears.
A flock of Carmine Bee-eaters

Video

An amazing sight — a colony of thousands of Carmine Bee-eaters in the Zambezi Region, Namibia caught on camera by Dr. Steve Osofsky, director of the Cornell Wildlife Health Center and professor at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.
A bull elk shown in Yellowstone National Park by Christine Bogdanowicz.

For Your Information

This perspective piece, co-authored by Cornell's Dr. Robin Radcliffe, highlights how wildlife health is an important part of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, which guides wildlife management and conservation decisions in the U.S. and Canada, and is vital to its future.
Why We Do What We Do: A Herd of Elephants in Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

Video

“This is why we do what we do,” says Cornell Wildlife Health Center director Dr. Steve Osofsky, who took this video of an elephant herd this spring while working with local partners in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area in southern Africa.
Dr. Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond with kanga blog thumbnail

News

For Cornell alumnus Zachary Dvornicky-Raymond, a career in conservation may have been an inevitability. An animal lover for as long as he can remember, Dr. Dvornicky-Raymond recalls, “as I grew up and was attending zoos and learning more about the world, I came to realize that all of the animals that I loved and was so interested in were disappearing. So I always knew I wanted to figure out a way to help them.”
Two tigers shown in and along a river with two greater one-horned rhinos seen in the distance.

Video

At the end of a busy season researching how canine distemper virus affects Nepal’s tigers and leopards, Cornell Wildlife Health Center’s wild carnivore health specialist Dr. Martin Gilbert took a break to recharge his batteries with the wildlife of Bardia National Park.