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Cornell University

January 2023

Steve Osofsky standing by jeep in Bwabwata National Park

From Ithaca to the plains of southern Africa, the Cornell Wildlife Health Center is working to heal the natural world. Launched in 2020, the center was formed to unite Cornell’s leading wildlife health professionals under a common mission: to repair the fractured relationship between people and nature.
CVM staff and students treating a pelican by Jonathan King

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center has launched a new Student Support Fund for off-campus apprenticeships with free-ranging or captive wildlife, on-campus wildlife research, and student travel to present at professional conferences on wildlife health and conservation.
Hammerhead shark

Led by Cornell's Dr. Michael Stanhope, a team of scientists have sequenced genomes of the great hammerhead shark and shortfin mako shark, both endangered species.
A Four-toed Salamander shown above the leaf litter by Alex Roukis

Protecting wildlife is hard, and a key step to determine if a wildlife species needs conservation intervention is finding them. The Cornell Wildlife Health Lab's Alyssa Kaganer describes using eDNA techniques to successfully find four-toed salamanders.