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Cornell University

February 2021

Panelist speakers at Symposium

Future pandemics can be averted if the world’s governments eliminate unnecessary wildlife trade and adopt holistic One Health approaches, according to experts at a February 23 virtual conference, hosted by Cornell and WWF.
A Bengal Tiger looking very regal by Blake Meyer

For Your Information

Tigers are among the most charismatic of endangered species and garner significant conservation attention. However, their evolutionary history and genomic variation remains poorly known, especially for Indian tigers. With 70% of the world's wild tigers living in India, such knowledge is critical for their conservation.
Rhino hanging upside down from helicopter

In an effort to save endangered rhinos, Cornell researchers and Namibian colleagues found that transporting rhinos upside down from helicopters was safe and quick.
Coronavirus

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center's Dr. Steve Osofsky observes that the recent World Health Organization report on the origins of COVID-19 reinforces what we’ve long known.
Jane Goodall

The Cornell Wildlife Health Center, Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability, and the World Wildlife Fund will host a free, virtual conference on February 23, focused on humans, wildlife and the prevention of future pandemics. The keynote address will be given by Jane Goodall, trailblazing conservationist and UN Messenger of Peace.
Dr. Melissa Hanson drawing blood on a red-tailed hawk at the Cornell Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospita

Dr. Melissa Hanson, first-year resident in Zoological Medicine at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, received a research award from the College to study refeeding syndrome in wild red-tailed hawks at Cornell’s Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Hospital.